At Tier I, student concerns are addressed by informal parent and teacher conferences. Tier I should be started when you recognize that a student is either struggling to learn the core curriculum or having difficulty maintaining appropriate behavior in the general education classroom or when the student is required to have Personalized Education Plan (PEP).

Think of Tier I as a booster shot to the core instruction. The core curriculum, be it in reading, writing, math or emotional development, is a systematic, consistently delivered curriculum adopted by the district and used throughout with fidelity. If the core curriculum is delivered inconsistently or with variability from class to class it will be impossible to determine if the core is meeting expectations. It will also be impossible to develop strategic and individual interventions for a student if the core curriculum is lacking. The core curriculum should meet the needs of a majority of the students in the class.

Activities at Tier I include the parent and teacher working together to Define the Problem.
  • What is it?
  • When does it occur?
  • Why is this happening?
  • Analyze baseline data or develop plan for collecting baseline data?

Some guiding questions for defining the skill area include:
  1. In the area of (content, skill), peers are able to (What can they do?)
  2. Compared to his/her peers (student) is able to (What can s/he do?)
  3. How far off grade level (the learning gap) is (student) in this area?
  4. Are there prerequisite skills that (student) must do in order to perform as well as his/her peers?
  5. (If yes to #4) What skills can (the student) do and what skills is s/he not able to do?
  6. Identify which skill(s) should be addressed.

When considering the skill area, some guiding insights include:
  • Does it have endurance? Is the skill needed over time?
  • Does it have leverage? Will proficiency in this skill help the student in other areas of the curriculum and other academic disciplines?
  • Does it develop student readiness for the next level of learning? Is it essential for success as the student moves through the curriculum and/or to the next level?

Based on baseline data develop an intervention plan
  • Parent and teacher together brainstorm ideas for interventions. Discuss what interventions look like. Look at differentiated instruction.
  • Develop progress monitoring plan
  • Set time table for reconvening to evaluate interventions
  • Implement intervention plan
  • Evaluate (Teacher and parent use progress monitoring data to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions.)

When writing goals keep in mind the rate at which the student's peers are progressing, identify a timeframe for accelerating (the student's) learning to the level of his/her peers. This becomes your long term goal. Using the long term goal as a guide, determine reasonable short term goal(s).

The goal needs to be a SMART goal.
  • S -specific - Well defined. Clear to anyone that has a basis knowledge
  • M-measurable - Concrete criteria for measuring progress
  • A-attainable -Challenging, but not out of reach
  • R-realistic - Within the availability of resources, knowledge and time
  • T-timely - Grounded within a time frame

Intervention Design


Academic Intervention Design

Focus: Ongoing monitoring and adjustments of instruction are designed to meet the needs of students
Design: Specific to the student's learning profile
Utilization of flexible grouping for differentiation of instruction based on skill level
Research-based classroom interventions designed to achieve grade-level content expectations
Minimum 2 to 3 intervention sessions per week
Interventionist: Primarily the classroom teacher and parent. Other school personnel may be involved in rare cases, when identified by need.
Setting: Intervention sessions should be occurring primarily in the general education classroom
Progress Monitoring: Must take place a minimum of once a month

Behavior Intervention Design

Focus: Ongoing monitoring and adjustments of classroom and school-wide behavior expectations designed to meet the needs of students.
Design: Specific to the student's learning profile
Research-based classroom interventions designed to achieve behavioral expectations
Minimum 2 to 3 classroom behavioral lessons. (See PBS lessons)
Interventionist: Primarily the classroom teacher and parent. Other school personnel may be involved in rare cases, when identified by need.
Setting: Intervention sessions should be occurring primarily in the general education classroom.
Progress Monitoring: Must be reviewed a minimum of once a month.

Reflective Questions for Decision Making for Tier I

Use the Implementation and Evidence Questions when making decisions for Tier I

Implementation
  • Did the delivery of interventions follow the plan for implementation with accuracy and consistency?
  • Is progress monitoring of the intervention used and adjustments made as needed?
  • Did the intervention match the student's specific need?
If the answer is “no” to any of the above questions, you must first make adjustments to the plan before considering moving the student up a Tier II.

Evidence
  • Does the instruction or the intervention decrease the student's learning gap (learning rate)?
  • Does the intervention reduce the problem behavior and/or increase the desired behavior?
  • Does progress monitoring data determine the intervention to be effective?
  • Does student performance improved as measured by assessment(s)?

Forms, etc.

Form
PDF
Word
Interactive
(open in word)
Tier I/PEP



Intervention Program



Intervention Program Directions

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Intervention Program Examples



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Spanish Tier I/PEP



Parent Document (English)

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Parent Document (Spanish)

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Parent Invitation (English)



Parent Invitation (Spanish)



EC PEP



Directions for EC PEP

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PEP for students instructionally on grade level


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Reflective Questions for Decision Making

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Classroom Performance checklist for language issues